Hyderabad as a Tourist Centre and Global city

Hyderabad as a Tourist Centre and Global city

As a global city

A great assimilation of all cultures, a strong presence of top-class R&D institutions, a fast-growing IT sector, expanding education hub – all these make Hyderabad a vibrant city. Yet, multitude of problems like pollution, slums and infrastructural bottlenecks hold back the throbbing city from emerging as a true global city. Resolution of these issues, creation of a further strong industrial eco-system and the success of the ambitious ITIR region plan – with a potential to attract Rs 2 lakh crore investments – would ensure rapid transformation of the city into a key global city. Let Hyderabad prosper for the prosperity of the State, the nation and the world.

The city has a history of assimilating diverse cultures which is the first prerequisite to be a global city. Besides this hoary past, the city is fast acquiring economic muscle to qualify to be a true global city. The Socio Economic Outlook 2015, brought out by the Government of Telangana, has observed: “The information technology revolution, economic globalization and the political leadership have been catalyst in nurturing Hyderabad as one of the nerve centers of global economy.”

In the early phase of its modern growth, the city could attract huge public sector investment. Key and strategic industries in defence, electronics, pharmaceutical, heavy electrical, machine tools, alloys, etc., have come up in public sector. Besides, the city is the home to dozens of research organizations of national repute. In the recent phase, the IT growth turned Hyderabad into India’s Silicon Valley. This paradigm of development has opened up employment and investment opportunities to people from across the country. The Telangana region was in fact ill-equipped to garner a lion’s share of fruits of such a growth. This model of growth has certainly strengthened the city’s cosmopolitan character, but the flipside of it is that Hyderabad is plagued by uneven geography of development further complicated by demographic changes.

The unprecedented urban growth levied enormous pressure on the civic resources especially on its infrastructure like roads, water supply, waste management etc. The city was converted into a concrete jungle endangering the climatic advantages it always possessed. The city needs huge investment in physical and social infrastructure to cope up with the demands imposed by the transformation into a global city. The Government of Telangana is in the process of preparing a “vision document to make Hyderabad a global city.” The work is in the tendering stage. Apart from the global city plan, the vision document will encompass various interventions , physical and social infrastructure developments. The new industrial policy framework acknowledges the need for revitalising the industrial scenario of Hyderabad.

The new industrial policy framework emphasises on reinventing Hyderabad’s industrial eco system. Particular emphasis has to be laid on using Hyderabad as a growth engine to positively impact the entire state. The Centre has approved the setting up of a 202-square kilometer IT Investment Region (ITIR) in and around Hyderabad with an investment potential of over Rs 2.19 lakh crore and potential of creating 15 lakh direct jobs. The ITIR would comprise areas such as Cyberabad Development Authority (CDA), including Gachibowli and Madhapur, Hyderabad Airport Development Authority (HADA) area including Mamidipalli, Raviryal, Adibatla and Maheswaram as well as the Uppal and Pocharam belt. The ITIR project would further consolidate the IT sector in the city, adding to the geography and economy of the city. The city has to develop an efficient, reliable and affordable public transport system to measure up to the needs of contemporary growth.

Out of about 8 million motorised trips in the city, the share of public transport is a low 44%. At present, there are over 3 million vehicles and about 0.2 million vehicles are getting added every year, causing frequent traffic jams and leaving the city polluted. Experts in the field suggest that about 70 per cent of the city commuters should use public transport to make it an ideal city. It is a long way to go for Hyderabad to reach this ideal level. The Approach Paper to the 12th Plan of the Planning Commission said, “The process of urbanization is a natural process associated with growth…Agglomeration and densification of economic activities (and habitations ) in urban conglomerations stimulates economic efficiencies and provide opportunities for earning livelihoods. Possibilities for entrepreneurship and employment increase when urban concentration takes place, in contrast to the dispersed and less diverse economic possibilities in rural areas. This enables faster inclusion of more people in the growth process and therefore more inclusive. There is synergistic relationship between rural prosperity, and the continuum of urban development from small towns through larger cities to metros. A holistic approach to spatial development is needed for inclusive growth. The growth of Hyderabad as an international city would thus contribute significantly to the prosperity of Telangana State and to the overall economy of the country.

Hyderabad as a tourist centre

Golkunda fort

A medieval fort now overlooking the city, Golconda is one of the historical places to visit in Hyderabad. Originally built in mud on a 400ft hill, the fort ruins of today have seen the reign of several dynasties. Situated 11km away from the bustling urbanism of Hyderabad, it derives its name from a Telugu word meaning Shepherd’s Hill. Reminiscence of a well-planned Golconda city within the fortress limits is evident even now.  The remains of multiple fortification layers, armories, magazines, mosques, granaries, reservoirs, audience chambers and royal dwellings complement the striking appearance of the fort.  Famous for its acoustics, a unique signalling device that was incorporated in its construction, the structure is known for its palaces, ingenious water supply system and the famous Fateh Rahben, one of the cannons used in the last siege of Golconda by Aurangzeb. The Sound & Light show brings alive the grandeur of one of India’s famous forts.

Char Minar

The epic signature of the city, Char Minar makes for a wonderful sight. Located in the heart of Hyderabad’s old city, surrounded by Mecca Masjid, built using bricks from Mecca and Laad Bazaar – a boisterous shopping street, this landmark is laced in history.  Built in 1591 by Muhammad Quli Qutub Shah, it was constructed to commemorate the founding of Hyderabad and also to ward of a deadly epidemic that was rampant then in the Golconda region. Graced by 4 minarets soaring almost 50ft in height, it has a mosque and 45 prayer spaces is amongst the famous places in Hyderabad.

Shri Jagannath Temple

One of the temples to visit in Hyderabad is the Shri Jagannath Temple, a modern day temple built by the local Oriya community over here. This replica of the original in Puri draws devotees with its sanctum sanctorum housing statues of Lord Jagannath, and his siblings Lord Balabhadra and Devi Subhadra.  The spectacular temple is well constructed with an attractive Shikhara measuring 70ft in height. A true representation of the original, the construction in red sand stone is a visual marvel and is known for its annual Ratha Yatra.

Birla mandir

Located on the south end of Hussain Sagar Lake, the Birla Mandir is an enchanting modern temple built atop the Kala Pahad, the twin hillock of the Naubat Pahad. With mixed architectural styles from Odhisha and South Indian, the place of worship is embellished with exotic epic scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata that are finely sculpted in marble. The inner shrine of the temple has an 11ft tall replica of Tirupati Venkateswara.  Revel in several marble carvings depicting Indian mythology in the adjoining ‘Mukha Mandapam’. The temple also houses consorts of Venkateswara, Padmavati and Andal as well as has a separate shrine dedicated to Buddha.

Ramoji Film City

Certainly one of the best places to visit in Hyderabad with family, Ramoji Film City makes its way to every traveller’s list because of its magical theme around cinema, which is the most common love of every Indian. Ramoji Film city is said to be one of the haunted destinations in India. The only one of its kind in India, this holiday destination offers something special to everyone and is one of the best places to visit in Hyderabad.   The world’s largest integrated film city, spread across 2,000acres ensures that every visitor makes most from the day spent here. Features include well-defined categories of entertainment suited for different ages from Eureka, the performance arena modelled on the lines of royal forts hosting live shows, to getting a tour of a typical film studio, multi-cuisine restaurants, shopping venues, kids’ park, and even a bird park.visiting the film city is one of the best things to do in Hyderabad. This destination can be enjoyed over a one day trip or one could stay back at this holiday destination.

Hussain Sagar Lake

One of the largest man-made lakes in India, Hussain Sagar Lake has been adorning the twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad since 1562. A tourist destination that cannot be missed as places to visit in Hyderabad with family, the lake is best to spend time around dusk with pleasant air filling the surroundings.  Adding to its charm is the monolithic statue of the Buddha installed in the heart of the lake. Several facilities around the lake periphery such as boating and water sports, and the neighbourhood Lumbini Park, an amusement park are add-on attractions.

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